Sunday, November 16, 2014

Meatloaf Wellington ~The Kitchen Witch ~ Mealtoaf Wrapped in Puff Pastry

When I was growing up my mom made meatloaf for dinner once or twice a month - usually on a Monday - and I'd get a meatloaf sandwich in my lunch the next day. Back then meatloaf was always served the same way: with mashed potatoes, frozen mixed vegetables, and some kind of pan gravy my mom would throw together with Cream of Mushroom Soup.

I grew up loving that dinner and as an adult nothing says winter comfort more than a meatloaf. But that doesn't mean I have to prepare it the same way every single time like my mom did because the beauty of meat loaf is how versatile it is.

Keeping that in mind, today's dish was created in the style of a traditional beef wellington with a duxelles filling, golden puff pastry, and mushroom gravy.




















Better still, this show stopper of a dish is economical and easy to make.

Join me today in the Kitchen Witch Cottage and cook along with me!





Meatloaf Wellington
Visit the printable recipe here: Meatloaf Wellington

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 80 minutes
Serves: 6

Ingredients
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 diced onion
  • 16 button mushrooms that have been washed roughly chopped
  •  2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1 tsp. powdered beef stock
  • 1/2 cup beer
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 tsp. black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 2 lbs. extra lean ground beef1 tbsp. granulated garlic
  • 1 tsp. black pepper
  • 1 tbsp. HP or A1 Sauce
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup Panko bread crumbs
  • 1 box frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 1 egg mixed with 1 tbsp. water (for the egg wash)
For the Gravy
  • 1 cup sliced button mushrooms
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 2 tbsp. flour
  • 2 cups beef stock

  1. Saute the onion and mushrooms in the extra virgin olive oil over medium high heat until the mushrooms begin to lose their water and you get lots of good golden brown flavour going in the bottom of the pan.
  2. Add the minced garlic and powdered beef stock and stir to incorporate.
  3. Deglaze the pan beer and stir well getting all the flavour off the bottom of the pan. Add the fresh thyme, black pepper, and sea salt and set aside to cool slightly.
  4. Add the granulated garlic, black pepper, HP or A1 Sauce, egg, and panko breadcrumbs to the ground beef. Mix well.
  5. Place half the meat mixture into the bottom of a loaf pan sprayed with oil. Flatten it out evenly and cover with the mushroom mixture. Place the remaining ground beef mixture over all, spread evenly and flatten and bake in a 350 oven for 50 minutes.
  6. Remove the meatloaf from the oven and let it cool slightly - in the meantime, let the puff pastry warm up a bit on the counter - it should be well thawed - and then roll it into a large rectangle.
  7. Place the cooled meatloaf top side down onto the center of the puff pastry and fold like a present. Use the egg wash to seal
  8. You can also have fun with it by cutting out shapes and placing them onto the top. Brush the egg wash over all, increase the heat in the oven to 400 and bake on a baking tray for another 25-30 minutes until golden brown.
  9. Let rest five minutes while you make your gravy.
  10. Saute the mushrooms in a non stick pan that's been treated with cooking spray. Saute until the mushrooms are golden and have begun to release their water.
  11. Add the butter and let melt.
  12. Add the flour to form a roux and continue to cook and stir for a minute.
  13. Add 2 cups of beef stock, bring to the boil, and whisk until thickened. Cut the meatloaf into slices serve drizzled with the mushroom gravy.

Author:

Lyndsay Wells is a professional trainer, writer, and program developer with a passion for food and cooking. She is an award winning recipe developer, a former website ambassador for Kraft Foods Canada, the $20,000.00 winner of the online competition "The Real Women of Philadelphia" and a finalist on the Food Network Canada show Recipe to Riches. Lyndsay believes cooking should be approachable and easy and has great tips and ideas for putting together sophisticated looking dishes that cooks of all levels can accomplish.

No comments:

Post a Comment